How to Easily Manage Your Home Part 7: What to do if You Have Tried EVERYTHING and Your House Still Feels Chaotic.

How to Easily Manage Your Home Part 7: What to do if You Have Tried EVERYTHING and Your House Still Feels Chaotic.

Do you feel like you have tried everything and your house is still chaotic?

If you have been following along since the beginning of my How to Easily Manage Your Home series and implementing the routines and putting everything into practice but your house still isn’t running as smoothly as you would like – this post will hopefully help you out!

I wanted to troubleshoot with those of you who are still struggling to manage your home and see if there might be some other reasons that are leading to this problem.

If you prefer to watch the video that goes along with this post, here it is:

What To Do If Your House Still Feels Chaotic

1) Possible Problem #1

If you are still struggling with the day-to-day management of your home, the first thing that could be tripping you up is if you have not effectively integrated your family into helping you out around the house.

Now I know this can take some time, so you may still be working on it.

But there are a couple of other areas you want to be aware of as you get them to help you out.

Especially if your children are young, you want to make sure that you’re coordinating your cleaning routine with their chore schedule.

It doesn’t have to match exactly, but ideally it should coordinate with what your children will be doing each day.

For example, if I am cleaning my downstairs, I am not going to send my young children upstairs to clean their rooms. Kids are pretty social as a general rule, so it works much better to have them do some cleaning on the same floor that you are on.

I will have my kids dust the furniture on the same floor that I am cleaning on or I will have them clean the bathroom as I am vacuuming on the same floor.

And that way you’re just all in the same space and are working together, and if they have any problems or need some help, I’m only a few steps away.

2) Possible Problem #2

Another thing you want to keep in mind when you are getting your children to help out around the house is to make sure you are giving them enough chores so that they feel like they’re actually making a difference.

This can be a little counterintuitive, especially if your children aren’t used to doing chores. You may think you want to start them out kind of easy.

If they’re currently just in charge of making their bed and cleaning their room, they will feel more grown up and feel like they are helping out more if they have other chores that help the entire family.

Now, I don’t think that children need to work all day long, but I think that each child should have enough chores for their age.

And I’ll tell you a story about something that happened very recently at our house . . .

I decided to increase the number of chores that my six-year-old was doing because she had just recently turned six.

At first she was not happy about it. She didn’t understand why she had to do so many chores, and she wished she was still three like her sister because her sister doesn’t have to do as many chores and “it just wasn’t fair.”

But after only a couple of days, she started doing her chores faster. She started doing them better. She started actually completing the chore in a way more like I would’ve done it than she had been doing it before.

She also started trying to do the chore before I asked her to. She would sneak around and try to get her chore done before I realized it, and then come and get me and show me what a good job she had done.

So I found this very interesting because it validated everything that I had heard about children really wanting to be valued and wanting to be an important member of the family.

They don’t just want to take from the family, they want to give as well.

3) Possible Problem #3

Now, another area that you may want to look at if you are still struggling to manage your home is Meal Planning.

I have a series on YouTube where I show you How to Easily Plan Your Meals, and that will give you all the steps you can take to Easily Meal Plan,

So in this post I’m just going to give you a short list of things that you can do today to make your Meal Planning Easier.

Make Breakfast Super Easy

I’m talking about eating the exact same thing every weekday easy.

Or if you think you would get bored with that, you could come up with a five-day rotation like this:

  • Monday could be Granola
  • Tuesday could be Eggs and Toast
  • Wednesday could be Hashbrowns
  • Thursday could be Oatmeal
  • Friday could be Pancakes

By putting your breakfast menu on autopilot it takes you much less time to cook and clean up each time you do it.

Choose Simple Lunches

At our house, we eat leftovers every single day of the week.

This is a great way to reduce food waste, it takes no prep work at all, and it requires very little cleanup.

But again, if you think you would get bored with leftovers every day, you could come up with a five-day rotation like this:

  • Monday could be Sandwiches
  • Tuesday could be Salads
  • Wednesday could be Tacos
  • Thursday could be Leftovers
  • Friday could be Quesadillas

Then you could just repeat this rotation every week.

Four containers with exactly the same foods in each of them to be used for storage in a fridge or freezer

Use Theme Nights for Dinners

Now for dinners, I’m not gonna tell you to eat the exact same thing every week because that would be boring.

I may be a minimalist, but I’m not a minimalist when it comes to loving food!

Just about everyone in my family is a foodie so that would not work for us to have the exact same thing for dinner every single day.

So instead, what I suggest to simplify your meal planning is to create a Theme Night for every night of the week.

Then, each night of the week, all you have to do is come up with a meal that goes along with that Theme Night.

I have a blog post on How To Set Up Your Theme Nights With Over 50 Different Theme Night Ideas.

4) Possible Problem #4

Now, if you have your family helping you out, and you have your meal plans all taken care of, and your house still doesn’t feel like it is running on autopilot, you may want to take a look at you clutter.

Clutter can be a lot of different things. It can be :

  • Physical Clutter in Your House
  • Clutter on your Schedule
  • Clutter in your Mind

But I highly recommend that you look at all of these areas and figure out if any of them are causing stress in your life.

Yes, the routines that we discussed in this series will help your house run on Autopilot, and I recommend setting those up because it just gets your house going in the right direction.

But once you declutter, your house feels clean – All.The.Time.

I have a series on YouTube if you want to check out the four steps to Completely Decluttering Your Home. But I do want to give you a couple of things to get started.

Start with the Physical Clutter

You may have problems with clutter everywhere in your life, but starting with the physical clutter will be the easiest way to start easily running your home.

You can start by dedicating just 15 minutes a day to decluttering and it won’t be long before you notice results.

As soon as you get a bag or a box full of stuff, put it into your car so that you can drop it off next time you are near a donation center.

A woman tidying up and carrying boxes in a room filled with clutter

Next, Work on Simplifying Your Schedule

If your problem is having too many time commitments, I recommend going back and reading this post about How to Create a Weekly Rhythm, and that will help set you up for success.

Then you can implement some boundaries in your week so that you can start simplifying.

I also recommend setting a limit with your kids for how many extracurricular activities they can do so that you don’t ending up running people from one practice or event to another.

Freeing up you schedule allows for the truly important things to happen that often get pushed aside, like having dinner together.

So practice saying, “No.”

Practice saying, “No,” when you really don’t want to do something, but just kind of feel obligated to.

And practice saying, “No,” when your kids say, “Hey, can we do this other think in addition to all the other things we have been doing?”

5) Potential Problem #5

And if you have all of those areas working for you and you still don’t feel like your house is running itself, you may want to look at your Budget.

I have a full post on How to Start a Budget, and I will be doing a series down the road on Budgeting.

But I will give you a couple of tips here if you wanna get started:

First, create a spreadsheet for your budget so you can see where every single dollar is going.

Second, if you have any debt, whether that’s student loans, car loans, or credit card debt, you want to pay it off as quickly as possible.

It is so freeing not to have that hanging over your head every single month.

If you want to see the steps we took to paying off our student loan debt quickly, check out this post.

I hope this post helped your make your home less chaotic. If you want any help Putting Your Home on Autopilot, taking your home from Cluttered to Calm, or creating a Set It and Forget It Meal Plan, check out my courses because I would love to help you out!

Ready to Start Easily Managing Your Home?

If you are ready to get all of your routines in place so that your home practically runs itself, check out my course Put Your Home on Autopilot!

In Put Your Home on Autopilot, you will learn how to set up

  • A Daily Block Schedule
  • A Laundry Routine
  • A Kitchen Cleaning Routine
  • A Morning Routine for Mom
  • A Morning Routine for Each Kid
  • An Evening Routine for Each Kid
  • An Evening Routine for Mom
  • A Weekly Cleaning Routine
  • A Chore Routine for Each Kid
  • And More!

In just 8 weeks or less you will go from feeling overwhelmed to in control. And if you have any questions along the way, I’m only an email away!

I hope to see you inside the course!

(Or if you are more of a do-it-yourself kind of gal, you can check out my DIY Resources for Creating Your Routines.)

Want 7 Extra Hours Every Week? Grab the Streamline Your Home Quick-Start Guide!

Ready to Get 7 Extra Hours in Your Week?

How to Easily Manage Your Home Part 7

Then check out Simply Streamlined!

In Simply Streamlined, you will learn how to 

  • Declutter Your Home
  • Put Effective Routines in Place
  • Create a Set-It-and-Forget-It Meal Plan
  • Get Your Finances Under Control

Simply Streamlined walks you through exactly how to Completely Streamline Your Home in just 15 Minutes a Day!

Plus you will receive

  • Cluttered to Calm Lessons, Workbooks, and Spreadsheets
  • Put Your Home on Autopilot Lessons, Workbooks, and Spreadsheets
  • Set-It-and-Forget-It Lessons, Workbooks, and Spreadsheets
  • Master Your Money Lessons, Workbooks, and Spreadsheets
  • AND Weekly Live Coaching Calls!

I hope to see you inside the program!

(Or if you are more of a do-it-yourself kind of gal, you can check out my DIY Streamlining Resources!)

See you on the next one! Kassy
Easily Manage Your Home Part 6: How to Get Your Family to Help Out Around the House

Easily Manage Your Home Part 6: How to Get Your Family to Help Out Around the House

Do you ever feel like the responsibility of keeping your house running smoothly is entirely on your shoulders?

You know that if you ever stop to take a break, things are going to spiral out of control?

No matter how many times you have tried, it doesn’t seem like anyone else will help you out unless you beg…and plead… and nag?

Ugh! All the things that no mom wants to do!

Well in this post I’m going to walk you through how to get your family on board so that you can get some much needed downtime!

Sound too good to be true? Well try out the steps I outline in this post and see for yourself!

This post is Part 6 in our How to Easily Manage Your Home Series. The tips I discuss in the series build upon each other, so I do recommend starting at the beginning right here: How to Easily Manage Your Home Part 1. Then you can get your family on board in a way that will be sure to stick!

As we talk about How to Get Your Family to Help Out around the House, feel free grab a pen and that notebook that you have been using to organize your new routines and take notes.

Or, if you would like to have the same templates that I am using, feel free to grab the Autopilot Workbook. For this post we will be using the Chores by Age Sheet, the Regular Chores vs. Paid Chores Sheet, the Chores for Cash Sheet, the Family Meeting Agenda Sheets, and the Family Chore Calendar.

But if you don’t have the same templates that I do, you can make your own templates in a notebook!

And if you would prefer to watch the post, here is the video:

How to Get Your Family To Help Out Around the House

1) Get Your Spouse on Board

Now, if your spouse is already super helpful around the house and or you don’t have a spouse, you can skip ahead to the next section!

But if you want to get your spouse involved, sit down with them when the kids aren’t around and have an honest conversation with them.

Explain to them how you just can’t do every single thing by yourself.

Tell them about how you need help around the house from them and from the kids.

You aren’t the only person who makes the mess in the house so you shouldn’t be the only person cleaning it up.

Make sure that they are on the same page with you as far as getting everyone on board. Because what you don’t want to happen is for you to sit everyone down for your family meeting and have everyone rolling their eyes…including your spouse.

You want to show up to that family meeting united. Telling your kids, “Hey, this is something that we’re going to start doing as a family, and we’re really excited about the changes that are going to happen.”

Now as you start talking with your spouse, I want you to make a couple of assumptions. I know we aren’t supposed to assume, but stick with me here. I want you to assume that your spouse is not a jerk and that they wouldn’t mind helping if they knew how they could help.

A lot of guys don’t see things the way that we do. We see a messy kitchen and think, “Oh, this needs to be cleaned. I’d better do that.” And they see a messy kitchen and think “Huh. Somebody should clean that.”

Guys often have to be asked, and them needing to be asked doesn’t mean that they’re a jerk or that they don’t want to help us out. It just means that we need to ask.

Then once you and your spouse are on the same page, you can go through each of the steps I outline below and make these decisions together.

That way, when you do show up to your family meeting, the kids know that both parents are on the same page.

2) Assign Chores By Age

The next thing that you’re going to do is think about which chores you can give to each child and how many chores they should be doing each day.

If you have the Autopilot Workbook, the Chores by Age Sheet will tell you which chores each age group can do and how many chores each age group should do each day.

But essentially what you are doing with chores is slowly teaching them how to clean the entire house as they grow up.

Now, you obviously aren’t just going to start them with cleaning the entire house. But you want to be cycling them through all of the chores in the house so that by the time they are 18, they are at least familiar with and are able to do everything required for running a home.

Then when they are on their own, Easily Managing Their Own Home will be natural to them, which is pretty cool!

Something to keep in mind here is that once you assign chores, you want to re-evaluate them every few months to see if those chores are still a good fit for your child and your child’s age.

I’ve learned for my kids that it’s time to cycle through chores when they start to get bored and complain about the chores.

When that happens, try mixing up the chores and giving them some different responsibilities. They are usually excited to learn the new chore and they entertain themselves by setting stopwatches to see if they can shave off time week after week.

Example Chores for Two and Three Year Olds

So here are a couple of ideas for the two to three-year-olds.

They should be doing 1-2 chores per day.

And by “chores” at this age, I mean helping someone else who is doing a chore.

They can help spray cleaner when you are cleaning the bathroom. They can help wipe up spills. Basically, any chore that I was doing when my girls were this age, I was able to find some way that they could help me out with it.

They were learning life skills, getting used to helping the family, and *bonus*, they felt really important.

Example Chores for Four and Five Year Olds

Now four and five-year-olds are quite independent and they can do 2-3 chores per day, depending on the difficulty.

You don’t want your kid to feel like they’re doing chores all the time, but you want to give them enough that they feel like they are helping out.

They have actually done studies and found that children actually enjoy doing their chores when they feel challenged and feel like they’re actually making a difference in their family.

Kids, especially younger kids, really want to be challenged and want to feel like they’re making a big difference.

One thing that four and five year olds are quite capable of doing is cleaning a toilet.

This is still a big job for them and they are learning, so you’ll want to check their work after they are done and make sure they did it correctly.

Another thing they can do is clean the mirrors.

Basically, at this age, give them one piece of a larger chore! So instead of cleaning the entire bathroom, they can do any one part of the bathroom.

It works well to work on the rest of the chore with them so they can be learning all of the steps involved in that chore for when they are bigger.

Another thing I recommend for four and five-year-olds is to have them clean their own dish after each meal and put it into the dishwasher (or dry the dish and put it away if you don’t have a dishwasher).

Four to five year olds should also be able to make their beds on their own and tidy their own rooms.

How to Easily Manage Your Home Part 6

Example Chores for Six and Seven Year Olds

Then six to seven-year-olds can really start to be a big help around the house.

They can learn to clean the bathroom all by themselves, assuming they’ve learned the little steps along the way.

If you are just starting out and your child is six or seven and they’ve never done chores before, don’t just point them to the bathroom and say, “go clean the bathroom.”

You’ll want to start by showing them the baby steps so they can learn the whole process.

At this point, they can dust the furniture, clear the table, clear the counters, and lots of truly helpful chores!

There is a huge amount of independence at this stage. If you give them a chore and expect them to do it, they will rise to the occasion and be a helper around the house.

Example Chores for Eight or Nine Year Olds

Now eight and nine year olds are able to do even bigger chores.

They should be able to clean the kitchen (with a normal mess in it, we aren’t talking about after Thanksgiving Dinner or anything like that).

And they can do any part of the laundry independently, and even vacuum by themselves.

Chores for Ten, Eleven, and Twelve Year Olds

Then ten, eleven, and twelve year olds can tidy part of the house if you need them to.

They also should start cooking some simple dinners by themselves. If you have kids in this age range, I highly recommend giving them one night a week that they cook so that they can learn this skill and practice it on a consistent basis.

Chores for Thirteen, Fourteen, and Fifteen Year Olds

Then the thirteen, fourteen, and fifteen year olds should be able to mow the lawn and tidy the yard, cook more complex dinners by themselves, and they should be able to do their own laundry from start to finish without any micromanaging.

I highly recommend you have them doing their own laundry by this age because it is such an important skill and it will take a huge burden off of you!

two children loading the washing machine

Chores for Sixteen, Seventeen, and Eighteen Year Olds

Then the sixteen, seventeen, and eighteen year olds should be able to do everything involved with running the home.

If you and your spouse both work outside of the home and you have a child between 16 and 18, you could even give them the chore of doing the laundry for the family for the week or a different complex chore. They will be able to keep track and go back and switch the laundry over as needed.

If you are having a child do the laundry though, you may want to make sure that each member is folding their own clothes because you don’t want to overwhelm any one person.

Older children can also teach a younger sibling how to do a chore for their chore.

They should be able to cook pretty much any dinner by themselves at this age, and you could even have them go grocery shopping for you or create a meal plan.

grandmother and granddaughter having a conversation while cooking together

3) Write Down a List

So before you have your family meeting, write out a list of chores that you think each child in your family would be able to do.

You don’t have to decide which chores they will be assigned just yet.

But you should at least have a list of all of the chores that you would like to delegate to someone else.

4) Regular Chores Vs. Paid Chores

This is a question I get a lot: Should I pay my children to do chores or should they just do them?

And the answer is, “yes!”

You want them to have some chores that they do because doing chores is part of being in a family. But they should also have the opportunity to make money by doing extra chores that are above and beyond what is required to keep the house running.

My rule of thumb is that any chores that are required to keep the house running are just part of life and are not paid.

This is things like making the beds, cleaning the bathrooms, cleaning the kitchen, or doing the laundry.

No one pays you to clean your house, and kids have to learn that sometimes you just have to do things that you’d rather not do.

It’s life!

Anything that is extra or above and beyond a regular chore, they can get paid for.

This would be things like cleaning the baseboards, cleaning the windows, deep-cleaning the kitchen, raking the leaves, and cleaning door knobs, cleaning the light switches, or anything that isn’t required to keep the house running smoothly.

So with that in mind, decide on some chores that you are willing to pay for. Then decide how much you are willing to pay for each of those chores.

You want to be sure you decide on the amount you are willing to pay before the family meeting so you don’t end up overpaying for the chores!

Then after the meeting, you want to put this list of chores and how much you are willing to pay for each chore on the fridge.

Let them know that they can put their name next to each chore they would like to claim. Then they have one week to complete the chore, have it approved (make sure you check the chore and approve it after it is done), and get paid.

If they haven’t completed the chore within a week after they claimed it, someone else can claim it!

Now, one rule I like to have with this is that they have to do their regular chores before they can do any paid chores that day.

And this is just an extra incentive for them to get those regular chores done and not skip over them to do extra paid chores.

How to Get Your Family to Help Around the House

5) How to Have a Family Meeting

So the next thing you want to do is create a family meeting agenda.

If you have a spouse or significant other, I recommend figuring this out together so that you are both ready at the family meeting to explain the new rules to your kids.

1. Tell the Kids You Need Their Help

Let them know that you can’t do it all. You’re only human after all!

Explain that this will be a huge help for you. Let them know that you want them to be involved and learn how to run the house.

It is important for kids to feel that they are needed.

Don’t be surprised though if your children are less than enthusiastic about this change, they will get used to it!

2. Explain Any New Rules

This is something you and your spouse will want to decide on ahead of time as well.

Will there be any consequences if they don’t do their chores? Will there be rewards if they do complete their chores?

I recommend doing both because some kids are more motivated by rewards, and some are more motivated by consequences. So it’s really a good idea to have both set up and in place.

3. Read the Full List of Weekly Chores

If you aren’t sure how to create this list, check out How to Create the Best Cleaning Routine Ever which is Part 5 in this series.

A handwritten list of things to do

4. Let Your Children Choose

Then you go around the room and let each child pick one chore at a time that they would like to be responsible for.

The reason you want to let them pick is that there may be some chores that kids like doing more than others, so why not let each person do the chores they prefer!

You will also have a lot less resistance if you can get some buy-in from them by giving them some choice in the matter.

Then you keep going around and letting them choose chores until everyone has enough (remember younger children shouldn’t have as many as older children).

Now, some kids, especially if they’re really young, won’t have any idea what they’re actually capable of and they’ll just want to help out. So that’s when you’ll want to show them the list that you made of age-appropriate chores for each of them, and let them pick from that list.

But older children should definitely know what they’re capable of and what they aren’t.

5. Divide the Rest of the Chores

Then once the children have all the chores that they need, divide the rest of the chores between yourself and any other adults in the house.

I recommend doing it this way because you want the kids to have the first pick.

They aren’t going to like doing chores, but they’re kids. So you want to kind of give them a break and let them pick first.

And when it comes to dividing up the chores among the adults, I also recommend that you let the other adults choose first.

I do this because I know I would rather have some help even if I’m stuck with doing the things that I would rather not do, than to have no help at all.

It just is easiest to get other people’s buy-in when you are letting them choose first.

6. Create a family chore chart.

Then, once you’ve assigned the chores to everyone, create a family chore chart together.

On your family chore chart you will write down which chores are getting done on which day by which person. This keeps everyone accountable to completing their chore every week.

A Dad and Daughter Doing Dishes

7. Add chores to the morning and evening routines.

Then add the chores to the morning and/or evening routine for each child.

Putting the chores into the routines makes doing chores a habit so that you don’t have to constantly nag people to get their chores done.

Now you may be thinking, why not just do a chore checklist? Well, you can, but I actually prefer to put it on the morning and/or evening routine.

This way the chores become automatic and the kids won’t have to think about when they should do their chores, they will just do them!

We want the house to feel like it is running itself, and the way to make that happen is by creating routines that set us up for success.

8. Discuss rewards and consequences

Again, look at this ahead of time, but don’t have anything set in stone before your family meeting.

We want to get that buy-in from everyone involved. So ask the kids what would be some good rewards if they get their chores done without being reminded.

An idea for this would be if they get their chores done all week long without having to be reminded, then they get to stay up for an extra hour or two on the weekend.

Take into account each child’s personality, and each child’s love language when you are deciding on rewards and consequences. If you don’t know your children’s love languages, check out The Five Love Languages of Children. But I recommend trying to figure out their love languages as you set up these rewards and consequences.

I actually think it’s a good idea to have specific rewards and consequences for each child in your family, because if a reward or a consequence isn’t motivating, it’s not going to work.

It makes much more sense to spend a little bit of time figuring out exactly what would be motivating and what would not be motivating to each person.

9. Explain the chores for cash

Then once you have the rewards and consequences in place, you can explain the chores for cash.

Explain that if they are doing all of their regular chores, they have the opportunity to do some extra chores to make some money.

I hope you found this post helpful for getting your family involved with helping out around the house!

Want 7 Extra Hours Every Week? Grab the Streamline Your Home Quick-Start Guide!

Ready to Start Easily Managing Your Home?

If you are ready to get all of your routines in place so that your home practically runs itself, check out my course Put Your Home on Autopilot!

In Put Your Home on Autopilot, you will learn how to set up

  • A Daily Block Schedule
  • A Laundry Routine
  • A Kitchen Cleaning Routine
  • A Morning Routine for Mom
  • A Morning Routine for Each Kid
  • An Evening Routine for Each Kid
  • An Evening Routine for Mom
  • A Weekly Cleaning Routine
  • A Chore Routine for Each Kid
  • And More!

In just 8 weeks or less you will go from feeling overwhelmed to in control. And if you have any questions along the way, I’m only an email away!

I hope to see you inside the course!

(Or if you are more of a do-it-yourself kind of gal, you can check out my DIY Resources for Creating Your Routines.)

Ready to Get 7 Extra Hours in Your Week?

Then check out Simply Streamlined!

In Simply Streamlined, you will learn how to 

  • Declutter Your Home
  • Put Effective Routines in Place
  • Create a Set-It-and-Forget-It Meal Plan
  • Get Your Finances Under Control

Simply Streamlined walks you through exactly how to Completely Streamline Your Home in just 15 Minutes a Day!

Plus you will receive

  • Cluttered to Calm Lessons, Workbooks, and Spreadsheets
  • Put Your Home on Autopilot Lessons, Workbooks, and Spreadsheets
  • Set-It-and-Forget-It Lessons, Workbooks, and Spreadsheets
  • Master Your Money Lessons, Workbooks, and Spreadsheets
  • AND Weekly Live Coaching Calls!

I hope to see you inside the program!

(Or if you are more of a do-it-yourself kind of gal, you can check out my DIY Streamlining Resources!)

See you on the next one! Kassy
14 Reasons You May Want to Try Minimalism

14 Reasons You May Want to Try Minimalism

Sometimes minimalism can sound a little intense.

The white walls, the modern art, the stereotypes. . .

If you have ever been interested in minimalism, but have been intimidated by all of the reasons that you “couldn’t be a minimalist” then keep reading because this post is for you!

I’m going to show you how you can implement minimalism in the areas of your life that work for your family!

There are so many different ways that you can embrace minimalism in your life, and it doesn’t have to be an all or nothing type of thing. Just having minimalism in one or two areas of your life can help lower your stress and make your life easier.

As I go through the different types of minimalism, I’m going to tell you why you might find it helpful. I’m also going to tell you if it is one that I use in my house!

If you prefer to watch content instead instead of reading, here is the video that goes with the post:

Different Types of Minimalists

1) Ambience Minimalists

These minimalists stereotypically like the white walls, curated art, and keep very few possessions. This is what many people associate with minimalism.

These minimalists are really concerned with how their house feels and looks.

This type of minimalist is more concerned with having a minimalist look and feel to their house than they are with having any sort of personalized decor.

Now, I personally don’t relate to this type of minimalist because I love decorating my house with family pictures. And having a house that looks and feels like a minimalist house isn’t as important to me as having a customized space that I enjoy living in.

But just because I don’t personally relate to this one, doesn’t mean it wouldn’t be a great reason for you to explore minimalism. If you love clean lines and clean looking spaces, this may be a great reason for you to check out minimalism and see if it might fit with your lifestyle.

2) Cozy Minimalists

The cozy minimalist is much more concerned with having a space that is customized to them and feels cozy when they are in it.

Often when you think of the ambiance minimalist, it looks like a sterile environment. Often they don’t have as much furniture, or if they do, it’s very minimalist. Typically no throw pillows and things like that.

Whereas, the cozy minimalist will have more pillows, blankets, wall decor and things that just make the house feel homey.

You would enjoy this type of minimalism if you want your house to feel clean, but you also want it to be comfortable and feel like it’s customized to you and your lifestyle.

This is definitely a type of minimalism I subscribe to. I love having a home that is easy to clean, but also feels warm and inviting.

A lady reading a book with a cup of hot tea.

3) Extreme Minimalists

Now, this is the type of minimalism that you would have seen if you watched the documentary on Netflix called Minimalism. These people have very little furniture, they pack for months in a tiny little suitcase, and they just have a miniscule amount of possessions.

People who like this type of minimalism will often will count their possessions and know exactly how many things they have in their house at all times.

This is not a type of minimalism that I am drawn to. I like to have enough things in my house for it to be comfortable for me to live in.

However, some people find this type of minimalism freeing because they can easily pack and travel at a moment’s notice.

So if you just have too many things in your house and you’re ready to just get rid of everything, this type of minimalism may appeal to you.

4) Frugal Minimalists

Frugal minimalists are typically drawn to minimalism because minimalists tend to buy less things. And when you buy less things, you happen to have more money (funny how that works 😅).

This type of minimalism might be appealing to you if you are already a frugal person by nature. But it might also be something that could help you if you have a budgeting problem and you need to reign in your finances.

Being a frugal minimalist helps you to not spend extra money unless you actually need to.

This is one reason I was drawn to minimalism in the first place because I am a very frugal person and I don’t like spending money on things that I don’t need.

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5) Meal Planning Minimalists

Now often when people become meal planning minimalists, they create meal plans where they eat pretty much the same thing every single day. Or they may have a one-week or a two-week rotation of meals that they repeat over and over again.

Now, I do implement this type of minimalism in my house… but I put my own spin on it!

If you’ve read any of my meal planning posts, you know that I am a huge fan of having theme nights for every night of the week, and that simplifies my meal plan, without making things boring.

If you want to check out the Crazy Way I Meal Plan, you can read this post. Or if you want some help creating your own meal plan, check out Set It and Forget It Meal Planning.

But this is a great way to simplify your meal plan while still having variety!

6) Budgeting Minimalists

These types of minimalists are different than the frugal minimalists in that they try to actually minimise the overall budgeting process. This means that they will often have maybe one giant account that they pull everything out of, and they just have very broad categories within their budget.

Maybe at most they have four accounts that they work with, but it’s very simple, very streamlined. A lot of things will come out of the same chunk of money because they don’t want things to get too complicated with their finances.

Now I don’t personally subscribe to this type of minimalism. And I actually recommend that people have several accounts for their budget because that actually simplifies things in your mind. Check out this post here if you want to know which accounts I think everyone should have.

If you feel like you are going in way too many directions with your budget and you need to simplify it, this might be a type of minimalism that would work for you.

7) Stuff Minimalists

Just in case you’re wondering, yes, I am making some of these terms up as I go along 😅. But stuff minimalists are people who just don’t want to have so much stuff in their house.

They don’t really care if their home has the perfect minimalist ambience. They don’t necessarily care if they have a cozy minimalist house.

They just want to have less stuff in their life, and they want it NOT to look like Toys R Us threw up in their house.

So yes, this is a type of minimalism I definitely can relate to because I do not like having too much extra stuff laying around my house whether that stuff be toys, clothes, books, or anything else.

You may be interested in this type of minimalism if you feel like you just have so many things that you can’t keep your house clean.

I highly recommend stuff minimalism for anyone who has kids. I have found time and time again that my kids are happier, they share better, and their rooms stay cleaner more easily when we have less stuff.

I can always tell when it’s time to go through and start decluttering some things when they start fighting about toys.

And there’s kind of this reverse logic with it because you think when they have more, they should be happier. But it’s just not the case.

If you are interested in stuff minimalism, Check out this post on How to Start Decluttering When You are Overwhelmed by Clutter.

You can grab my Easy Decluttering Checklist and get started today! And if you want a little help, check out my decluttering program, Cluttered to Calm.

8) Cleaning Minimalists

The next type of minimalist is a cleaning minimalist. Cleaning minimalists just like to clean their house as quickly and efficiently as possible.

And if you’ve been around my blog or my YouTube channel before, you know that I can absolutely relate to this type of minimalist!

I used to clean my house all day on one day of the week and expected it to stay clean all throughout the week. And it did not work. So instead, I created a very simple weekly cleaning routine where I do a small amount of cleaning every day of the week except for my rest day.

So if you are interested in this type of minimalism, you can check out my simple weekly cleaning routine and create your own.

And if you would like to easily run your entire home, check out my Put Your Home on Autopilot course.

A clean, minimalist room

8) Low Waste Minimalists

Low waste minimalists embrace minimalism because they want to have a lower impact on the environment.

Now, this was not one of the original reasons that I came to minimalism. However, I would definitely say it is something I can relate to now!

Because I am a frugal minimalist, I started looking into buying things that were more reusable and figuring out which things I didn’t need to buy anymore. And it kind of led me down this low waste rabbit hole, which has been fun and eye opening!

And the further down the rabbit hole you go, the more willing you are to do some crazy things in the name of being low waste.

But if you care a lot about the environment or you just want to reduce your impact on the environment, this would be a great reason for you to explore minimalism.

9) Schedule Minimalists

Schedule minimalists want to have more white space on their calendars. They like to say no to a lot of things so that they can really enjoy the things that matter.

I definitely relate to this type of minimalism and I highly recommend it if you have children. Children can get very overwhelmed if they are constantly going and doing something (like so many of us are in western society).

If you schedule in time to be slow and schedule in simple days, children cope much better. And honestly, so do we, even if we don’t want to admit it!

So, if you are interested in this type of minimalism, check out my How to Set Up a Weekly Schedule so that you aren’t constantly going from one thing to the next.

10) Routine Minimalists

The next type of minimalists on my list are routine minimalists.

And these people really like to have a simple, predictable routine that will make their lives easier.

I can definitely relate to this type of minimalist as well because as you guys know, I love setting up easy routines that just make your life kind of run on Autopilot.

And if you guys are interested in setting up some routines that will help your home run itself, check out the YouTube series I did on How to Easily Manage Your Home, where I walk you through how to create every single routine that you need for your home to run smoothly.

A plant and cup on a coffee table.

11) Travel Minimalists

The next type of minimalists are travel minimalists.

This is a type of minimalism that I was interested in back when my husband and I were first married. We really slimmed down on just about everything else so that we could pay off our debt and travel before we had kids.

But this isn’t necessarily a huge driving reason for us now because we are on one income and we have kids, so we just don’t get to travel as much as we would like to.

But if you want to travel more, travel minimalism can definitely help you do this!

12) Quality Over Quantity Minimalists

Next are the quality over quantity minimalists.

These minimalists are very similar to the travel minimalists because they are able to get exactly what they want, when they want it, since they don’t have all the extra stuff and noise in their life.

For me this was not something that initially drew me to minimalism. I was very frugal and I liked buying clothes on the sale rack at Walmart because I figured “Why spend any more than that?”

But as I’ve gotten a little older, I have realized that certain things will last longer when you buy Quality over Quantity.

So this has been a mindset shift for me as I have continued to explore different aspects of minimalism. But it has definitely paid off to spend a little bit more on something that will last much longer than to buy something cheap over and over again.

So this type of minimalism might appeal to you if you are tired of buying cheap things and having them break all the time. You can invest a little bit more upfront and have things that last longer.

13) Off-The-Grid Minimalists

The next type of minimalist that I have on my list is the off-the-grid minimalists.

These people really like to be on their own.

They have so few needs and ones that they can take care of without needing anyone else to help them out.

Now, I just spent a week off-the-grid backpacking with my husband and several friends, and it was amazing. But I don’t know that I’d want to do that full time.

So I don’t really think that it’s for me, but I can definitely see the benefits of it if it appeals to you!

I mean, you’d spend a lot less money and you’d have a lot less waste if this was the type of minimalism that you embraced.

14) Practical Minimalists

The next type of minimalist is the practical or moderate minimalist.

These people love the benefits of minimalism, but they aren’t ever going to count their possessions or worry about how many things they have… as long as they have a manageable amount for them.

They also aren’t particularly worried about if they feel like they have a minimalist house or if their house is cozy.

They just take the aspects of minimalism that work for them. So this is definitely something I can relate to, although I do like to have a cozy atmosphere.

I think it is more important to be practical about how minimalist you are, than to just to be a minimalist for the sake of being a minimalist.

15) Rule-Breaking Minimalists

And the last type of minimalist that I have on my list is the rule breaking minimalist. There are a lot of unspoken rules out there about being a minimalist, but these types of minimalists just don’t care if they are breaking the rules or if they’re doing everything correctly.

But if you have seen my post on the 12 Minimalist Rules That I Break, you can probably guess that I can definitely relate to this type of minimalist.

Because, like I just mentioned above, I think it is more important to have a type of minimalism that works for you and works for your family than it is to just say, “I’m a minimalist and I follow all of these rules,” even if I don’t enjoy following them.

So that is it. That is all of the different types of minimalist that I could think of. Let me know in the comments below if you think I missed any, and I’d love to hear which types of minimalists you most relate to or which types you could definitely never see yourself becoming.

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  • Completely Declutter Every Room of Your Home
  • Get Your Family on Board with Decluttering (and maybe even Excited about it!)
  • Set Boundaries so that you will NEVER have to Declutter Again
  • And Do It All In 8 Weeks or Less!

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Plus you will receive the Cluttered to Calm Decluttering Workbook and Spreadsheet and email support from me anytime you have questions.

I hope to see you inside the course!

(Or if you are more of a do-it-yourself kind of gal, you can check out my DIY Decluttering Resources!)

Want 7 Extra Hours Every Week? Grab the Streamline Your Home Quick-Start Guide!

Are you Ready to Get 7 Extra Hours in Your Week?

Then check out Simply Streamlined!

In Simply Streamlined, you will learn how to 

  • Declutter Your Home
  • Put Effective Routines in Place
  • Create a Set-It-and-Forget-It Meal Plan
  • Get Your Finances Under Control

Simply Streamlined walks you through exactly how to Completely Streamline Your Home in just 15 Minutes a Day!

Plus you will receive

  • Cluttered to Calm Lessons, Workbooks, and Spreadsheets
  • Put Your Home on Autopilot Lessons, Workbooks, and Spreadsheets
  • Set-It-and-Forget-It Lessons, Workbooks, and Spreadsheets
  • Master Your Money Lessons, Workbooks, and Spreadsheets
  • AND Weekly Live Coaching Calls!

I hope to see you inside the program!

(Or if you are more of a do-it-yourself kind of gal, you can check out my DIY Streamlining Resources!)

See you on the next one! Kassy
How to Help Your Kid Choose a Hobby | Minimalist Hobby Ideas for Kids

How to Help Your Kid Choose a Hobby | Minimalist Hobby Ideas for Kids

My oldest daughter has always been really good about knowing exactly what she wanted to spend her time doing.

When she was 4 she wanted to learn to crochet. So we asked a friend who knew how to crochet if she would teach her. She brought over a bag of yarn and crochet needles, and our oldest has been making little bookmarks, necklaces, bracelets, and dolly blankets ever since.

When she was 5, she asked us if she could take violin lessons. So I found a teacher and she began to play.

And most recently on her 7th birthday she decided that she wanted to start making and selling homemade soap. So we figured out how to help her set up her little business, and off she went!

Our middle daughter, however, has not been as original with her ideas. When we ask her what she is interested in learning, what instrument she is interested in playing, or what business she would like to have someday; she responds, “Crocheting, violin lessons, and having a soap business.”

Recently, she had begun asking over and over again when she could start HER soap business. And I realized that I needed a plan.

I couldn’t have two competing soap businesses in my house. And I didn’t exactly feel like starting a business with my four-year-old (even starting a business with a seven-year-old is a lot of work for the parents).

But I did know that she needed SOMETHING that was hers. Something that she could spend her time on. Something that would give her some quality time with me and/or my husband.

That’s when it dawned on me, she didn’t need a business, she needed a hobby!

How to Know If Your Child Needs a Hobby

1) If they are bored.

If your child is following you around all of the time and not doing anything by themselves, then they probably need a hobby.

2) If your child is asking to spend more time with you.

This may seem like the opposite of what I just said, but hear me out.

I am home with my kids 24/7. Yet, one of my children was telling me that she needed and wanted to spend more time with me.

In our case, I think this is because we have a six month old so I spend a lot of time feeding and taking care of him. And my seven-year-old also has a lot of hobbies that she tends to get help with.

But my middle daughter didn’t have any designated time with me that was just on her own.

3) If they want to do anything and everything they see someone else do.

If every time you get together with friends and your child sees the cool things that they are doing and then immediately asks if they can do it too. That probably means that they don’t have something that they are excited about and they just want to copy someone else.

4) If they are spending too much time on media.

Outside of Facetiming with grandparents and the occasional educational YouTube video, our kids don’t get any screen time.

But I realized with my younger daughter right before we found a hobby for her, that she was asking A LOT to watch YouTube videos about topics she was interested in.

It wasn’t a big problem since she was learning, but I still don’t think that learning on a screen is as good as learning hands on.

If you are finding that all your child wants to do is watch other people live life on YouTube, play video games, or watch TV or Movies; help them find a hobby!

Three children are sitting on a sofa engrossed in a mobile phone, laptop and a tablet

5) If they don’t have anything to talk about with other people.

When friends or family would ask my older daughter what was going on in her life, she would have plenty to tell them about.

But my younger daughter mostly would focus on telling them about what she *wanted* to do (like starting a business like her sister).

We realized that she didn’t have anything that she was currently doing that she was passionate about. And we knew that needed to change.

Things to Look for When Choosing a Hobby

1) Something that is uniquely theirs.

Our entire family likes to go snow skiing in the winter and backpacking in the summer. Those are great hobbies that we all enjoy (my younger daughter’s Christmas list included a lot of backpacking gear), but this isn’t something that any of our kids can call their own.

I wanted the hobby my daughter picked to be something that she could grow with and take individual pride in.

2) Something that allows them to learn.

When I was looking at hobby ideas online, I realized that I wanted a hobby for my daughter that would allow her to learn a skill of some kind and help her grow.

This may not be important to everyone, but if my kids are spending a lot of time on something, I want it to be edifying.

Two children sitting outside under a tree with a scout field book and binoculars

3) Something that they can do on a weekly or daily basis.

Like I said before, backpacking and skiing are fun hobbies that get you outside… but they aren’t something that my child can do whenever they have free time.

They involve planning and someone else to drive them to where they need to go.

I wanted to help her find a hobby that she could do whenever the mood struck!

4) Something that won’t add needless clutter to your home.

And of course, as a Minimalist Mamma, I wanted to find a hobby that wasn’t just going to add a bunch of useless junk to my house. Now, useless junk is in the eye of the beholder, but for me, I didn’t just want collector hobbies or hobbies that were going have me storing a bunch of projects forever.

The thing I love about my daughter’s soap business, is that she sells the soaps. So we have a little bit more soap making supplies than we previously did, but we don’t just have tons of soap sitting around our house with no purpose.

5) Do they want to be able to give gifts?

My daughters LOVE giving gifts. They especially love giving gifts when they have made them.

One of the things that was frustrating my middle daughter was that she wanted to give gifts to people like my older daughter was with her soaps. The problem was that she wasn’t quite good enough at crocheting to give a nice gift to someone.

So this was another thing I was looking for when helping her choose a hobby, something where she could make things that could be used as gifts.

Plus, when they are giving their finished products away as gifts, you aren’t trying to store them forever… see what I did there 😜.

Two kids dying eggs

How to Choose a Hobby

1) Look at What they Already Enjoy

The easiest way to find a hobby for your child is to find something that they already enjoy and expand on it to make it more of a hobby.

With my daughter, she had recently been asking to water color every time she had the chance.

So I put this on her list of possible hobby ideas (since I didn’t know if she actually loved water coloring, or if that’s just what she was doing because she didn’t have anything better to do.)

2) Do Some Research

If they already have something that they love that they would like to expand into a full hobby, do some research about how to do that.

If they don’t already have something that they would like to do more often, do some research for hobby ideas.

Now when you start the research journey, I highly recommend doing this without the child looking over your shoulder. There are a lot of hobbies regarding collecting this, that, or the other thing. But this Minimalist Mamma wasn’t a fan of those hobbies and I wouldn’t have wanted my daughter to get excited about them when I didn’t want her doing them in the first place.

Here is a list of Minimalist Hobby Ideas for your child:

  1. Cooking
  2. Baking
  3. Making backpacking food from scratch
  4. Gardening
  5. Painting
  6. Watercoloring
  7. Drawing
  8. Woodworking
  9. Photography
  10. Music Lessons
  11. Crocheting
  12. Knitting
  13. Finger Knitting
  14. Sewing
  15. Nature Watching
  16. Astronomy
  17. Meteorology
  18. Reading
  19. Puzzles
  20. Cycling

3) Let Them Choose

After I compiled my list of hobbies that I was okay for her to choose, I told my daughter that instead of starting a business we were going to pick a hobby.

She is four so she had no idea what that meant. But as soon as I explained it to her, she was stoked!

I read her the list of hobbies, and she seemed mildly excited about all of them. But when I got to the hobbies that she was very interested in, her eyes lit up and she said “OH I WANT TO DO THAT!!”

So every time she did that, I would write down the item on another list that we could narrow down from there.

Her short list included:

  1. Making Backpacking Food
  2. Music lessons with Mommy
  3. Woodworking
  4. Watercoloring
  5. And Crocheting/Finger Knitting
A mother and grandmother teaching their daughter to knit.

4) Get the Supplies and Get Started!

The last thing is just to gather any supplies that you need and get started! On the list above I linked the supplies that you may want to get for each hobby.

I hope this list helped you choose a hobby for your kids.

Hobbies are so great for kids because they not only give them something to do with their spare time, but they also give them skills that will last for their whole life.

Even if the hobby that you choose isn’t the one that will be their hobby forever, it will still teach them how to learn something new and how to get better at a task. And those things can be applied to any situation!

Want 7 Extra Hours Every Week? Grab the Streamline Your Home Quick-Start Guide!

Want to Get 7 Extra Hours in Your Week?

Then check out Simply Streamlined!

In Simply Streamlined, you will learn how to 

  • Declutter Your Home
  • Put Effective Routines in Place
  • Create a Set-It-and-Forget-It Meal Plan
  • Get Your Finances Under Control

Simply Streamlined walks you through exactly how to Completely Streamline Your Home in just 15 Minutes a Day!

Plus you will receive

  • Cluttered to Calm Lessons, Workbooks, and Spreadsheets
  • Put Your Home on Autopilot Lessons, Workbooks, and Spreadsheets
  • Set-It-and-Forget-It Lessons, Workbooks, and Spreadsheets
  • Master Your Money Lessons, Workbooks, and Spreadsheets
  • AND Weekly Live Coaching Calls!

I hope to see you inside the program!

(Or if you are more of a do-it-yourself kind of gal, you can check out my DIY Streamlining Resources!)

See you on the next one! Kassy
How to Create Morning and Evening Routines for Moms and Kids // How to Easily Manage Your Home Part 3

How to Create Morning and Evening Routines for Moms and Kids // How to Easily Manage Your Home Part 3

Have you ever tried to create a morning or evening routine but found it difficult to stick with?

I think we all have😅!

There are a few reasons for this: one is that we don’t have our day set up correctly (see How to Easily Manage Your Home Part 1 and Part 2), another reason is that we create routines that are too difficult to stick with, or maybe there is nothing in our routine to motivate us to complete it.

No matter what your problem has been, this article that will help you solve them!

It is easy to get so caught up with life that we forget to stop and think about how we start and end the day. Or worse still, we forget to think about how our kids start and end the day.

Starting and ending the day on the right foot will help you defeat overwhelm and make you feel like you are in control of your life.

And getting a morning and evening routine set up for your kids will do away with a lot of the nagging that goes along with getting ready for the day or getting ready for bed.

So let’s go ahead and get started!

Grab your pen and notebook, or get out your Autopilot Workbook. We will be using the Daily Routines for Mom and Daily Routines for Kids pages.

If you are making your own template, that is totally ok! I just recommend that you put 7 little checkboxes by each item that you are including in the routine.

Putting boxes or circles or whatever you want to check off makes it more motivated for you (and your kids!) to complete the checklist. And this also allows your children to gain independence and take ownership of completing their own checklists once they get the hang of it.

How to Create the Perfect Morning and Evening Routines

1) Mom’s Morning Routine

I figured that we would start with the first routine of the day and work through the day setting up our routines.

Since I have a detailed post on creating an effective morning routine even if you aren’t a morning person, this will just be an overview. You can see the full post here if you are interested.

1. Brainstorm

To get started with Mom’s Morning Routine, we are just going to write down a list of things that we would like to do if we had a little extra time in our day.

You don’t have to be too realistic at this point, this is a dream list!

2. Time Each Item

Once you have your list complete, write down the amount of time that each item on your list should take next to it.

This will help you determine how many things you can do during your routine.

3. Choose Your Wake Up Time

When you are choosing what time you want to get up, be realistic about when you think you will be able to get out of bed… and when you think your kids will get out of bed.

Ideally, you’ll want to have the bulk of your morning routine (if not all of it) done before your kids get up.

I like to have my morning routine completed before my girls wake up. It just helps me get the day started on the right foot when I get some things accomplished and have some time alone before the house gets busy.

When I sleep until my kids wake up, I feel like I am already starting my day behind.

So I want to set the wake-up time that will allow me to complete my morning routine before the earliest that the girls will wake up.

Our girls typically wake up between 7:00 am-8:00 am, which means I need to have my routine finished before 7:00 am.

If I set it to be finished at 8:00 am, I wouldn’t be finished if they wake up early. But if I set my routine to be finished at 7:00 am and they sleep a little longer, bonus time for me!

So I decided to set my wake-up time for 6:00 am. And since Ross wakes up at 6:00 am, that is a time that was realistic for me to wake up. It is much easier to wake up when someone else is waking up!

How to Create Effective Morning and Evening Routines for Your Family

4. Prioritize Your List

Now we are going to go through and prioritize our list.

Don’t prioritize your list based on how you think it should be prioritized… prioritize it the way that you want to prioritize it.

Here’s an example of what I mean:

You may feel like you should put exercising on your prioritized list because it’s good for you and you’ll feel good after you do it…

BUT if you don’t already have a good exercise routine, trying to exercise in the morning while you are trying to create and stick with a morning routine is going to be difficult.

If exercising isn’t motivating for you, you are more likely to hit your snooze button many, many times instead of getting up early and getting it done.

Establish a good morning routine first, then work on the exercise routine or vice versa!

No matter what you think you should have in your morning routine, you will be most motivated to get up when you have something that you look forward to on your routine.

5. Transfer Your List onto Your Template

Then the last step for creating Mom’s Morning Routine is to transfer your finished routine onto the Daily Routines for Mom page if you are using the Autopilot Workbook.

My Current Morning Routine:
Before the Girls Wake Up:
  • Brush Teeth
  • Do Devotions
  • Drink Water
  • Work Until the girls Wake Up
After the Girls Wake Up:

Once the girls wake up, we do this part of our Morning Routines in tandem. (They make their bed while I make mine, they get themselves dressed while I get dressed.)

  • Get Dressed
  • Make Bed

That is the end of the official morning checklist, but I also write down:

  • Work out
  • Shower

Because I like to keep track of how often I am working out, but it isn’t something that I need to get done before the girls wake up.

Sometimes we go on a bike ride in the mornings, or sometimes I will work out while they are eating breakfast, it just depends on the day and what we have going on.

So you can make your Morning Routine as Simple or Complex as you would like!

Only you know what will be motivating for you to get up and do every day and if your morning routine should end when your kids get up, or if you want to include everything in your Morning Block on your checklist.

But no matter how you have your Morning Routine whether it is Simple or Complex, I just recommend that you have A Morning Routine.

I found for myself that I am just a better mom when I have a little time for myself every morning to get a couple of the things done that I want to before I start doing things for my family all day.

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2) The Kids’ Morning Routine

Now let’s move on to creating the Morning Routine for Your Kids.

If you are using the Autopilot Workbook, print off as many of the Daily Routines for Kids pages as you have children. (I printed off 2 since I have 2 kids. 🙂

Write Down Everything They Need to Do

The Morning Routine for the kids should be much simpler than yours, but it is still a good idea to write everything down.

Before I started doing the checklists with my kids, every morning and evening was a struggle to get through our routine.

Once we wrote it down and gave them a checklist, they were able to take ownership of getting themselves ready for the day and for bed at night (even if they still like us to tuck them in!)

As you are writing everything down, even though we want their routine to be simple, we also want it to be detailed.

If you haven’t noticed, kids aren’t the greatest at connecting the dots… so if you don’t write down fold pajamas, put them away, and get dressed, the pajamas will probably end up thrown on the floor.

You have to write down every little step because you are teaching them the process. They don’t already know the proper order of things, so you have to tell them.

My Girls’ Morning Routines:
  • Go Potty
  • Fold Pajamas
  • Put Away Pajamas
  • Get Dressed
  • Make Bed
  • Read Bible Story
  • Work on Memory Verse
  • Drink Water
How to Easily Manage Your Home Part 3

3) Kids’ Evening Routine

Now that we have our morning routines taken care of, let’s shift to creating our evening checklists.

In my house, our evening routine starts when we finish family worship and it ends when the girls are in bed going to sleep.

I recommend using your evening checklist for your kids in a similar way, essentially it is just a checklist of everything that they need to do to get ready for bed.

That way when you tell your kids to do their evening checklist, they are ready for the bed when they are finished.

So go ahead and write down everything that you want to put on your children’s checklist on the Daily Routine’s for Kids Template, or on your own template if you are making your own.

Just be sure that your own template has at least 7 checkboxes for each of the items on the kids’ checklist.

This will help them start to do the checklists on their own.

Now you may be thinking that your kids are too young to have their own routine that they do by themselves each evening. And I completely understand that. my girls are 3 and 6 and they still need quite a bit of help to get through their evening routine.

But having the evening routine as a checklist takes away a lot of the negotiating when it comes to getting ready for bed.

The checklist also helps them get excited about getting ready for bed and it gives them some independence.

So if you have any difficulty getting your kids ready for bed, I recommend trying out the checklist!

My Kid’s Evening Routine

  • Put on Pajamas (By Themselves)
  • Put Clothes in the Laundry or Away in the Drawers (By Themselves)
  • Brush Teeth (With Help)
  • Go Potty (By Themselves)
  • Read a Story (With Help)
  • Sing a Song (With Help)
  • Say a Prayer (With Help)
  • Turn on Lectrofans (By Themselves)

Once they get to the part of the routine where they are reading, singing, and praying, Ross and I rotate back and forth with helping them.

This allows each girl to get individual mommy and daddy time and it lets them read stories that are appropriate to their ages.

If you aren’t sure how to create a simple, effective bedtime routine, check out How to Create a Bedtime Routine for Your Kids.

4) Mom’s Evening Routine

The last routine that we need to set up is our evening routine.

I think it is important for moms to have an evening routine because it can be really easy for us to keep doing housework until we go to bed. And it’s really nice to start and end your day with a little bit of “me” time.

But when we create our evening routine we don’t have to go back to square one since we already created our wish list on our scratch paper of all of the things that we wanted to do when we had a little bit of free time.

So we are just going to grab that Prioritized wishlist from back when we were creating our morning routine and look at the items that didn’t make the cut.

Now keep in mind as you are creating your evening routine, that you want to take your personality into account.

You might be looking at my morning and evening routine thinking “wow she is getting so much stuff done, I should do that too!” But remember that I have a Type A personality, and I LOVE being busy and working.

It’s actually relaxing for me to get work done… I know, I know, I’m a little crazy 😂.

But if you have a Type B personality, or a Type C, or even a Type D personality, the things that I enjoy probably won’t interest you… and they definitely won’t relax you!

You might enjoy reading a book, having a bubble bath, working on a craft, or maybe even just sitting and doing nothing for a while.

And that is totally ok!

You want to do whatever will help you relax and get ready for bed.

My Evening Routine

  • Put on Pajamas
  • Wash My Face
  • Make and Drink Tea
  • Work on Classwork
  • Work
  • Brush My Teeth
  • Read a Book
How to Create Morning and Evening Routines for Moms and Kids

6) Write Your Routines Into Your Block Schedule

And the final step is to take your Daily Block Schedule and write down “Mom’s Morning Routine, Kids’ Morning Routines, Kids’ Evening Routines, and Mom’s Evening Routine” in the correct blocks.

The reason that we want to put these into our daily routine is that it can be really easy to build these routines and never get around to using them.

By putting your routines into your Daily Block Schedule, the routines will become helpful tools that enable you to live a better life.

I hope you found this helpful! Let me know in the comments what your routines look like!

Be sure you grab your free Easy Home Management Checklist to see every routine that will help simplify your life.

Ready to Start Easily Managing Your Home?

If you are ready to get all of your routines in place so that your home practically runs itself, check out my course Put Your Home on Autopilot!

In Put Your Home on Autopilot, you will learn how to set up

  • A Daily Block Schedule
  • A Laundry Routine
  • A Kitchen Cleaning Routine
  • A Morning Routine for Mom
  • A Morning Routine for Each Kid
  • An Evening Routine for Each Kid
  • An Evening Routine for Mom
  • A Weekly Cleaning Routine
  • A Chore Routine for Each Kid
  • And More!

In just 8 weeks or less you will go from feeling overwhelmed to in control. And if you have any questions along the way, I’m only an email away!

I hope to see you inside the course!

(Or if you are more of a do-it-yourself kind of gal, you can check out my DIY Resources for Creating Your Routines.)

Want 7 Extra Hours Every Week? Grab the Streamline Your Home Quick-Start Guide!

Ready to Get 7 Extra Hours in Your Week?

Then check out Simply Streamlined!

In Simply Streamlined, you will learn how to 

  • Declutter Your Home
  • Put Effective Routines in Place
  • Create a Set-It-and-Forget-It Meal Plan
  • Get Your Finances Under Control

Simply Streamlined walks you through exactly how to Completely Streamline Your Home in just 15 Minutes a Day!

Plus you will receive

  • Cluttered to Calm Lessons, Workbooks, and Spreadsheets
  • Put Your Home on Autopilot Lessons, Workbooks, and Spreadsheets
  • Set-It-and-Forget-It Lessons, Workbooks, and Spreadsheets
  • Master Your Money Lessons, Workbooks, and Spreadsheets
  • AND Weekly Live Coaching Calls!

I hope to see you inside the program!

(Or if you are more of a do-it-yourself kind of gal, you can check out my DIY Streamlining Resources!)

See you on the next one! Kassy